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Newport Bermuda Race

The Newport Bermuda Race is one of the longest-standing offshore races in North America. The 635 nautical miles long race crosses the Gulf Stream and meanders through a sea territory known for its rapidly changing weather and heavy currents – a challenge for navigators and tacticians, as well as the whole crew. Depending on the weather conditions, the participating yachts need between three and six days to complete the route.

Newport Bermuda Race

Every two years in June, the race takes place and regularly attracts nearly 200 yachts to the starting line in front of the historic harbor of Newport Rhode Island. This years's fleet is divided into seven different classes––from state-of-the-art racers with professional crews, to a double-handed-division and cruising yachts with amateurs on board. New in 2016 is the Super Yacht Division.

The Race Course
The Newport Bermuda Race course appears deceptively simple. The starting line is set near Castle Hill Lighthouse at the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. The finish is 635 nautical miles to the southeast across open ocean.

Many sailors describe the Newport Bermuda Race as “three races in one”:

  1. Newport out to the Gulf Stream.
    The weather always influences where you go, and where you enter the Gulf Stream matters, since it meanders. You always have to keep an eye out for those warm water eddies and navigate your way through them correctly.
  2. Getting to the Southern side of the Gulf Stream.
    How long do you stay in the Stream? If you don’t calculate that properly, you have to figure out how to fix it.
  3. The finish to Bermuda.
    Wind circulation is always a factor, and you have to be on the correct side of wind shifts and weather systems to make an impressive finish.

Depending on the weather and the currents in the Gulf Stream, as well as the yacht’s size and speed, the Newport Bermuda Race takes two to six days.